Solar System Moons

1.      Which of the following are Solar System moons associated with the planet Mercury?

A.     Mercury has no moons.
B.     Phobos and Deimos
C.     Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto
D.     Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus
E.     Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon
F.     Proteus, Triton, Nereid

Mercury has no moons.

2.      Which of the following are Solar System moons associated with the planet Venus?

A.     Venus has no moons.
B.     Phobos and Deimos
C.     Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto
D.     Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus
E.     Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon
F.     Proteus, Triton, Nereid

Venus has no moons.

3.      Which of the following are Solar System moons associated with the planet Mars?

A.     Mars has no moons.
B.     Phobos and Deimos
C.     Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto
D.     Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus
E.     Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon
F.     Proteus, Triton, Nereid

Phobos and Deimos.  The origin of these relatively small moons remains uncertain but asteroid capture is a long-favored theory.  Phobos is projected to either impact the Martian surface, or more probably, break up into a planetary ring which will continue to spiral slowly into Mars in an estimated 7.6 to 11 million years.

4.      Which of the following are Solar System moons associated with the planet Jupiter?

A.     Jupiter has no moons.
B.     Phobos and Deimos
C.     Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto
D.    Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus
E.     Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon
F.     Proteus, Triton, Nereid

Jupiter has 66 moons but Io, Europa, Ganymede and Callisto are the four largest.  All four have radii larger than any of the dwarf planets. These are also known as Galilean Moons.

5.      Which of the following are Solar System moons associated with the planet Saturn?

A.     Saturn has no moons.
B.     Phobos and Deimos
C.     Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto
D.     Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus
E.     Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon
F.     Proteus, Triton, Nereid

Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus. Saturn has at least 62 moons, 53 of which have formal names.  Titan, the largest with a mean diameter of 5,152 km (3,200 miles), makes up 90% of the mass in orbit around Saturn, including the rings.  Rhea, the 2nd largest, has a mean radius about 30% that of Titan. Many of Saturn’s other moons are less than 50 km (31 miles) in diameter.

6.      Which of the following are Solar System moons associated with the planet Uranus?

A.     Uranus has no moons.
B.     Phobos and Deimos
C.     Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto
D.     Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus
E.     Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon
F.     Proteus, Triton, Nereid

Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon. Uranus has 27 known moons but Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, and Oberon compose the five main natural satellites. The Uranian satellite system is the least massive among the gas giants. The largest moon, Titania, has a diameter of only 1578 km ( 980 miles).

7.      Which of the following are Solar System moons associated with the planet Neptune?

A.     Neptune has no moons.
B.     Phobos and Deimos
C.     Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto
D.     Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Iapetus
E.     Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon
F.     Proteus, Triton, Nereid

Proteus, Triton, Nereid. Neptune has 13 known moons. Triton, with a diameter of 2700 km (1,680 miles), is by far the largest, comprising more than 99.5 percent of the mass in orbit around Neptune.

8.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Full moon as seen from Earth's northern hemisphere in 2010. Photograph taken with a Celestron 9.25 Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The brightness of this image is enhanced to show more detail. (Attribution: GNU Free Documentation License.)

Full Moon as seen from the Earth’s Northern Hemisphere.

A.     The Moon
B.     Mercury

The Moon.   The Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth, and is the fifth largest of the Solar System moons.  It is characterized by its large, dark volcanic maria which form part of the “Man in the Moon.”  The Moon is, under the Outer Space Treaty, free to all governments and privately funded organizations to explore for peaceful purposes.  The Moon orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 384,399 km (238,854 miles) around the Earth and its mean  diameter is 3,475 km (2,160 miles), about ¼ the size of the  Earth.

9.      What is the name of this solar system object?

A.     Phobos
B.     Deimos

The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took two images of the larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos, within 10 minutes of each other on March 23, 2008. This is the first, taken from a distance of about 6,800 kilometers (4,200 miles). Stickney crater, the largest, is on the right side.. (NASA.)

Mars larger and closer Moon, Phobos.

Phobos.  Mars moon, Phobos, is the larger and closer of the two small natural satellites orbiting Mars.  Phobos is projected to either impact the Martian surface, or more probably break up into a planetary ring which will continue to spiral slowly into Mars in an estimated 7.6 to 11 million years.  Phobos orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 9,377 km (5,827 miles) around Mars and its mean diameter is 22.2 km (13.8 miles). 

10.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Enchanced-color image of Deimos, a moon of Mars, captured by the HiRISE instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on 21 Feb 2009. Cropped from source image. (NASA.)

Mars smaller and outer Moon, Deimos.

A.     Phobos
B.     Deimos

Deimos.  Mars moon, Deimos, is the smaller and outer of the two small natural satellites orbiting Mars.  Both Phobos and Deimos were discovered by Asaph Hall, Sr. at the United States Naval Observatory in August 1877 while deliberately searching for Martian moons - Deimos on August 12th and Phobos on August 18th.  Deimos  orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 23,460 km (14,580 miles) around Mars and its mean diameter is 12.4 km (7.8 miles).

11.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Galileo spacecraft image of Io. The dark spot just left of center is the erupting volcano Prometheus. Whitish plains on either side of it are coated with volcanically emplaced sulfur dioxide frost, while yellower regions are encrusted with a higher proportion of sulfur. Taken by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, 1999. (NASA.)

Jupiter’s innermost Galilean Moon, IO.

A.     Io
B.     Europa
C.     Ganymede
D.     Callisto

Io.  Jupiter’s moon, Io, is the innermost of the four Galilean moons orbiting the planet Jupiter.  With over 400 active volcanos, Io  is the most geologically active object in the solar system.  This  activity is a result of tidal heating in its interior as it pulled between Jupiter and the other Galilean satellites, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto.  Most of Io’s surface is covered with sulfur and sulfur dioxide frost.  Io orbits at a radius of 422,000 km (262,000 miles) from the center of Jupiter and 350,000 km (217,000 miles) above its cloud tops.  Io’s mean diameter is 3,640 km (2,260 miles).

12.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Europa's trailing hemisphere in approximate natural color. The prominent crater in the lower right is Pwyll and the darker regions are areas where Europa's primarily water ice surface has a higher mineral content. Imaged on September 7, 1996 by Galileo spacecraft. (NASA.)

Jupiter Moon, Europa.

A.     Io
B.     Europa
C.     Ganymede
D.     Callisto

Europa.  Jupiter moon, Europa, is the smallest of the four Galilean moons of Jupiter, being slightly smaller than Earth’s Moon.  Europa has a tenuous atmosphere composed mostly of molecular oxygen (O2) formed through the process of radiolysis rather than biologically as is the case for the Earth’s atmospheric oxygen.  Europa is one of the top Solar System locations for the possibility of hosting extraterrestrial life, which could exist in its underice ocean.   Europa orbits Jupiter at an orbital radius of 670,900 km (417,000 miles) from the center of Jupiter and its mean diameter is 3,100 km (1,950 miles).

13.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Image of Ganymede's anti-Jovian hemisphere taken by the Galileo spacecraft. Lighter surfaces, such as in recent impacts, grooved terrain and the whitish north polar cap at upper right, are enriched in water ice. A true color image of Ganymede acquired by the Galileo spacecraft (taken on June 26, 1996). (NASA/JPL image).

Jupiter Moon, Ganymede.

A.     Io
B.     Europa
C.     Ganymede
D.     Callisto

Ganymede.  Jupiter moon, Ganymede, the third Galilean satellite outward from Jupiter, is the largest of all of the Solar System moons.  Its surface consists of dark regions, saturated with impact craters, and lighter regions crosscut by extensive grooves and ridges.  Ganymede orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 1,070,400 km (665,000 miles) around Jupiter and its mean diameter is 5,268 km (3,275 miles).

14.      What is the name of this solar system object?

View of the heavily cratered terrain of Callisto's anti-Jovian hemisphere obtained in 2001 by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The large impact structure Asgard is on the limb at upper right. The prominent rayed crater below and just right of center is Bran. Scientists believe the brighter areas are mainly ice and the darker areas are highly eroded, ice-poor material. NASA/JPL/DLR(German Aerospace Center).

Jupiter Moon, Callisto.

A.     Io
B.     Europa
C.     Ganymede
D.     Callisto

Callisto.  Jupiter moon, Callisto, is the outermost of the four Galilean satellites of Jupiter.  The surface of Callisto is heavily  cratered and extremely old.  Callisto is considered to be the most suitable place for a base for future exploration of the Jovian system. Callisto orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 1,882,700 km (1,170,000 miles) around Jupiter and its mean diameter is 4,820 km (3,000 miles).

15.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Mimas with its large crater Herschel. Prominent bright-walled craters in this view include Ban just left of center near top, and Percivale (with several dark streaks) two thirds of the way left of Herschel. (NASA Cassini, 2010-02-13).

Saturn Moon, Mimas.

A.     Mimas
B.     Enceladus
C.     Tethys
D.     Dione
E.     Rhea
F.     Titan
G.     Iapetus

Mimas.  Saturn moon, Mimas is the smallest known  astronomical body that is rounded in shape due to self gravitation.   Mimas’s most distinctive feature is a giant impact crater 130 kilometres (81 mi) across, named Herschel after the moon’s discoverer.  Mimas orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 182,000 km (113,000 miles) around Saturn and its mean diameter is 396 km ( 246 miles).

16.       What is the name of this solar system object?

Cassini's March 2008 flyby of Enceladus was designed to directly investigate the ongoing plume activity at the moon's south pole, but the path of the spacecraft allowed investi- gation of older evidence for internal activity near the north pole. Degraded craters, fractures and disrupted terrain in Cassini mosaic of Enceladus's north polar region. The two prominent craters above the middle terminator are Ali Baba (upper) and Aladdin. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.

Saturn Moon, Enceladus.

A.      Mimas
B.     Enceladus
C.     Tethys
D.     Dione
E.     Rhea
F.     Titan
G.     Iapetus

Enceladus.  Saturn moon, Enceladus, is one of only
three outer Solar System moons (along with Jupiter’s moon
Io and Neptune’s moon Triton) where active eruptions have
been observed.  Analysis of the outgassing suggests that they originate from a body of subsurface liquid water.  This observation, along with the unique chemistry found in the plume, has fueled speculation that Enceladus may be important in the study of astrobiology.  NASA scientists have reported (In May 2011) that Enceladus “is emerging as the most habitable spot beyond Earth in the Solar System for life as we know it.”  Enceladus orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 238,000 km (148,000 miles) around Saturn and its mean diameter is 500 km ( 310 miles).

17.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Tethys image from Voyager 2 in 1981, with the giant trough Ithaca Chasma extending diagonally down and left from prominent crater Telemachus at upper right. Smooth plains of the trailing hemisphere, with a reduced crater density, are visible at lower right. (NASA/JPL).

Saturn Moon, Tethys.

A.     Mimas
B.     Enceladus
C.     Tethys
D.     Dione
E.     Rhea
F.     Titan
G.     Iapetus

Tethys.  Saturn moon, Tethys, has a low density indicating that it is made of water ice with just a small fraction of rock. Tethys orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 295,000 km (183,000 miles) around Saturn and its mean diameter is 1,050 km ( 650 miles).

18.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Cassini enhanced-color composite of Dione, showing the darker, fractured terrain of the trailing hemisphere. The Padua Chasmata trace an arc on the left, interrupted near the top by central peak crater Ascanius. The Janiculum Dorsa extend along the upper right terminator. Near the lower left limb is the small crater Cassandra with its prominent ray system. (NASA Cassini, 2004.)

Saturn Moon, Dione.

A.     Mimas
B.     Enceladus
C.     Tethys
D.     Dione
E.     Rhea
F.     Titan
G.    Iapetus

Dione.  Saturn moon, Dione, is composed primarily of water ice but it must have a considerable fraction of denser material like silicate rock in its interior.  Dione orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 377,000 km (235,000 miles) around Saturn and its mean diameter is 1,120 km (700 miles).

19.      What is the name of this solar system object?

2005 Cassini view of Rhea's anti-Saturnian hemisphere, showing the moon's two largest impact basins (Mamaldi above and left of center, and adjacent Tirawa to its upper right). At highest resolution, several long linear features are visible: halfway down from center is Harahvaiti Fossa, while near the limb left of the bottom is Koykamou Catena. (NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.)

Saturn Moon, Rhea.

A.     Mimas
B.     Enceladus
C.     Tethys
D.     Dione
E.     Rhea
F.     Titan
G.     Iapetus

Rhea.  Saturn moon, Rhea, the 2nd largest moon of Saturn, has a typical heavily cratered surface.  Rhea orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 527,000 km (327,500 miles) around Saturn and its mean diameter is 1,530 km ( 950 miles).

20.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Titan in natural color from the Cassini spacecraft (2005). Only the moon's dense atmosphere, colored orange by organonitrogen haze particles, is visible. This image shows approximately what Titan would look like to the human eye: a hazy orange globe surrounded by a tenuous, bluish haze. The orange color is due to the hydrocarbon particles which make up Titan's atmospheric haze. The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency

Saturn’s Largest Moon, Titan.

A.     Mimas
B.     Enceladus
C.     Tethys
D.     Dione
E.     Rhea
F.     Titan
G.     Iapetus

Titan.  Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is the only natural satellite in the Solar System known to have a dense atmosphere.  Titan is the 2nd largest of all of the Solar System moons, after Jupiter’s moon, Ganymede, and is larger than the planet Mercury.  Titan orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 1,222,000 km (760,000 miles) around Saturn and its mean diameter is 5,150 km ( 3,200 miles).

21.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Approximately natural color mosaic of Iapetus taken in 2004. The view is dominated by the dark Cassini Region. Brighter terrain is visible high on Iapetus' northern latitudes. Hints of much brighter terrain can also be seen at the limb at approx. 7 o'clock position. Two huge and ancient impact basins are visible as well as a mysterious mountain range running precisely along the equator. North pole is approximately at 1 o'clock position and is in darkness here. (NASA / JPL / SSI / Gordan Ugarkovic.)

Saturn Moon, Iapetus.

A.     Mimas
B.     Enceladus
C.     Tethys
D.     Dione
E.     Rhea
F.     Titan
G.     Iapetus

Iapetus.  Saturn moon Iapetus is by far the most distant of Saturn’s large moons.  The low density of Iapetus indicates that it is mostly composed of ice, with only a small (~20%) amount of rocky materials.  Iapetus orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 3,500,000 km (2,175,000 miles) around Saturn and its mean diameter is 1,500 km ( 925 miles).

22.      What is the name of this solar system object?

So far the only close-up images of Miranda are from Voyager 2, which made observations of Miranda during its Uranus flyby in 1986. During the flyby the southern hemisphere of Miranda was pointed towards the Sun so only that part was studied. Miranda shows more evidence of past geologic activity than any of the other Uranian satellites. (NASA/JPL.)

Uranus Moon, Miranda.

A.     Miranda
B.     Ariel
C.     Umbriel
D.     Titania
E.     Oberon

Miranda.  Uranus moon, Miranda, is the smallest and innermost of Uranus’s five major moons.  Miranda shows more evidence of past geologic activity than any of the other Uranian satellites.  Miranda orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 129,500 km (80,500 miles) around Uranus and its mean diameter is 470 km ( 292 miles).

23.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Ariel by Voyager 2 in 1986. The canyon system Kachina Chasma stretches across the upper part of the image. (NASA/Jet Propulsion Lab.)

Uranus Moon, Ariel.

A.     Miranda
B.     Ariel
C.     Umbriel
D.     Titania
E.     Oberon

Ariel.  Uranus moon, Ariel, is the brightest and fourth-largest  of the 27 Solar System moons orbiting Uranus.  Ariel orbits at an elliptical  semi-major axis distance of 191,000 km (119,000 miles)  around Uranus and its mean diameter is 1,158 km ( 720 miles).

24.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Umbriel as seen by Voyager 2 in 1986.  At the top is the large crater Wunda, whose walls enclose a ring of bright material.

Uranus Moon, Umbriel.

A.     Miranda
B.     Ariel
C.     Umbriel
D.     Titania
E.     Oberon

Umbriel.  Uranus moon, Umbriel, has the darkest surface of any of the Uranian moons and appears to have been shaped  primarily by impacts.  Umbriel orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 266,000 km (165,000 miles) around Uranus and  its mean diameter is 1,170 km ( 727 miles).

25.      What is the name of this solar system object?

This high-resolution color composite of Titania was made from Voyager 2 in 1986. Titania has many scars due to impacts. Titania displays evidence of other geologic activity at some point in its history. The large, trenchlike feature near the terminator (day-night boundary) at middle right suggests at least one episode of tectonic activity. Another, basin like structure near the upper right is evidence of an ancient period of heavy impact activity. (NASA/JPL).

Uranus Moon, Titania.

A.     Miranda
B.     Ariel
C.     Umbriel
D.     Titania
E.     Oberon

Titania.  Uranus moon, Titania, is the largest and most massive of the 27 Solar System moons of Uranus and is the eighth largest moon in the Solar System.  The surface of Titania is relatively  dark and slightly red in color.  Titania orbits at an elliptical  semi-major axis distance of 435,900 km (271,000 miles)  around Uranus and its mean diameter is 1,580 km ( 980 miles).

26.      What is the name of this solar system object?

This 1986 Voyager 2 picture of Oberon is the best the spacecraft acquired of Uranus' outermost moon. Clearly visible are several large impact craters in Oberon's icy surface surrounded by bright rays similar to those seen on Jupiter's moon Callisto. Quite prominent near the center of Oberon's disk is a large crater with a bright central peak and a floor partially covered with very dark material. This may be icy, carbon-rich material erupted onto the crater floor. (NASA/JPL.)

Uranus Moon, Oberon.

A.     Miranda
B.     Ariel
C.     Umbriel
D.     Titania
E.     Oberon

Oberon.  Uranus moon, Oberon, is the outermost major moon of the planet, Uranus.  Oberon is the second largest and second most massive of the Uranian moons.  Like Titania,  the surface of Oberon is relatively dark and slightly red in color.  Oberon orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of  583,500 km (362,600 miles) around Uranus and its  mean diameter is 1,520 km ( 945 miles).

27.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Proteus is probably not an original body that formed with Neptune; it may have accreted later from the debris created when the largest Neptunian satellite Triton was captured. (NASA.)

Neptune Moon, Proteus.

A.     Proteus
B.     Triton
C.     Nereid

Proteus.  Neptune moon, Proteus, is the second largest moon of Neptune behind the mysterious Triton.  Proteus was  discovered only in 1989 by the Voyager 2 spacecraft.  This is  unusual since Neptune’s smaller moon, Nereid, was discovered  33 years earlier from Earth.  Proteus orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 117,650 km (73,120 miles) around Neptune and its mean diameter is 210 km (131 miles).

28.      What is the name of this solar system object?

1989 Voyager 2 photo mosaic of Triton's sub-Neptunian hemisphere. The bright, slightly pinkish, south polar cap at bottom is composed of nitrogen and methane ice and is streaked by dust deposits left by nitrogen gas geysers. The mostly darker region above it includes Triton's "cantaloupe terrain" and cryo-volcanic and tectonic features. Near the lower right limb are several dark maculae ("strange spots"). (NASA / Jet Propulsion Lab / U.S. Geological Survey.)

Neptune Moon, Triton.

A.     Proteus
B.     Triton
C.     Nereid

Triton.  Neptune’s largest moon, Triton, is the only large  moon in the Solar System with a retrograde orbit, which is  an orbit in the opposite direction to its planet’s rotation.  Because of its retrograde orbit and composition similar to Pluto’s, Triton is thought to have been captured from the Kuiper belt.  Triton orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of 355.000 km (220,000 miles) around Neptune and its mean diameter is 1350 km (840 miles).

29.      What is the name of this solar system object?

Nereid was fist discovered in 1949 but before this Voyager view of Nereid was obtained in 1989, all that was known about it were its orbital parameters and intrinsic brightness. This image has sufficient detail to show the overall size and albedo (the ratio of reflected to incident light). (NASA/JPL.)

Neptune Moon, Nereid.

A.     Proteus
B.     Triton
C.     Nereid

Nereid.  Neptune moon, Nereid, is the third-largest moon of Neptune and has a highly eccentric orbit.  It was discovered in 1949 on photographic plates taken with the 82-inch telescope at the McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas at Austin.  Nereid orbits at an elliptical semi-major axis distance of about 5,510,000 km (3,425,000 mi) around Neptune, but its high eccentricity of 0.7507 takes it as close as 1,372,000 km (853,000 mi) and as far as 9,655,000 km (5,999,000 mi) from the planet.  Its mean diameter is roughly 170 km (105 miles).

30.     Which of the following are the names of the Solar System moons of the dwarf planet, Pluto?

A.     Charon, Nix, Hydra, S/2011, S/2012
B.     Dysnomia
C.     Hi’iaka, Namaka

A.     Charon, Nix, Hydra, S/2011, S/2012.   Charon and Pluto revolve about each other every 6 days. The two objects are gravitationally locked, so each keeps the same face towards the other.  The average distance between Charon and Pluto is 19,570 km (12,160 miles).  Charon’s mean diameter is 1.207 km (750 miles), just over half the diameter of Pluto.  

Nix and Hydra orbit Pluto at approximately two and three times the distance of Charon: Nix at 48,700 km (30,267 miles) and Hydra at 64,800 km (40,273 miles) from the barycenter of the system.  They have nearly circular prograde orbits in the same orbital plane as Charon.  Observations of Nix and Hydra to determine individual characteristics are ongoing.

31.     Which of the following are the names of the Solar System moons of the dwarf planet, Eris?

A.     Charon, Nix, Hydra, S/2011, S/2012
B.     Dysnomia
C.     Hi’iaka, Namaka

B.     Dysnomia.  Dysnomia is the only known moon of the dwarf planet, Eris.

32.     Which of the following are the names of the Solar System moons of the dwarf planet, Haumea?

A.     Charon, Nix, Hydra, S/2011, S/2012
B.     Dysnomia
C.     Hi’iaka, Namaka

C.     Hi’iaka, Namaka.  Hi’iaka, the larger, outermost moon, has large amounts of pure water ice on its surface and orbits Haumea in a nearly circular path every 49 days.  Namaka, about one tenth the mass of Hi’iaka, orbits Haumea in 18 days in a highly elliptical orbit.

REFERENCES:  Most of the content in this section regarding the Solar System moons consists of  information from this NASA reference and from this Wikipedia.org reference, and their associated pages.

One Response to Solar System Moons

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